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Welcome to the University of Arizona Astronomy Club website! Our goal is to inspire and assist anybody with a passion or interest in astronomy and science. We provide opportunities to work on astronomy projects with other students and astronomers who care deeply about astronomy education.

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

The University of Arizona Department of Physics will be hosting a free cookout on Friday, October 3, starting at about 3:30 PM. This is a great opportunity for those who are interested in meeting Department of Physics faculty members, as well as graduate and undergraduate students. The meeting place will be outside of the western entrance.

Fall 2014 meetings will be held on Mondays from 5:00 PM to 5:30 PM in Steward Observatory room N305, beginning on September 8, 2014. Please see the Meeting Notes page for meeting notes.

To join the club, we encourage you to show up to our meetings and join in on our projects or events! Semester dues are $10 which goes toward all of the projects and activities in which we participate. Please peruse our website for much more information about our club. If you have any questions, please use the form on the Contact page.

Check out the special session organized by the University of Arizona Astronomy Club at the 223rd American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C.: AAS 223 Session 159 Video or search YouTube for “uaastroclub” and “AAS 223 Session 159″.

OFFICE HOURS

Megan: Tuesdays from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM and from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Samantha: Mondays from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM and Fridays from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Carmen: Wednesdays from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Ali: Tuesdays from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM and Fridays from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Matthew: Mondays from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Erica: TBD

If you’re in Phoenix near Arizona State University, join our friends at the ASU Astronomy Club!

Join our group on Facebook!Join our group on Facebook! Visit our YouTube channel!UAAstroClub YouTube Channel
Map to Steward Observatory:
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University of Arizona Astronomy Club Star Parties Click to learn more about our star parties!

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NASA Image of the Day

Fall Colors Arriving

 
A few days after autumn showed up on the calendar in the Northern Hemisphere, it showed up on the landscape of North America. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this view of fall colors around the Great Lakes on Sept. 26, 2014. The changing of leaf color in temperate forests involves several causes and reactions, but the dominant factors are sunlight and heat. Since temperatures tend to drop sooner and sunlight fades faster at higher latitudes, the progression of fall color changes tends to move from north to south across North America from mid-September through mid-November. In late summer and autumn, tree and plant leaves produce less chlorophyll, the green pigment that harvests sunlight for plants to convert water and carbon dioxide into sugars. The subsidence of chlorophyll allows other chemical compounds in the leaves—particularly carotenoids and flavonoids—to emerge from the green shadow of summer. These compounds do not decay as fast as chlorophyll, so they shine through in yellows, oranges, and reds as the green fades. Another set of chemicals, anthocyanins, are associated with the storage of sugars and give the leaves of some species deep purple and red hues. > More information Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike Carlowicz
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