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Welcome to the University of Arizona Astronomy Club website! Our goal is to inspire and assist anybody with a passion or interest in astronomy and science. We provide opportunities to work on astronomy projects with other students and astronomers who care deeply about astronomy education.

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

To join the club, we encourage you to show up to our meetings and join in on our projects or events! Semester dues are $10 which goes toward all of the projects and activities in which we participate. Please peruse our website for much more information about our club. If you have any questions, please use the form on the Contact page.

OFFICE HOURS

Office hours for the Spring 2015 semester will be posted when they are determined.

If you’re in Phoenix near Arizona State University, join our friends at the ASU Astronomy Club!

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Gallery

arizona-with-dave-helfand arizona-with-dave-helfand_sm In the gym Jupiter and the Pleiades

NASA Image of the Day

Hubble Sweeps a Messy Star Factory

 
This sprinkle of cosmic glitter is a blue compact dwarf galaxy known as Markarian 209. Galaxies of this type are blue-hued, compact in size, gas-rich, and low in heavy elements. They are often used by astronomers to study star formation, as their conditions are similar to those thought to exist in the early Universe. Markarian 209 in particular has been studied extensively. It is filled with diffuse gas and peppered with star-forming regions towards its core. This image captures it undergoing a particularly dramatic burst of star formation, visible as the lighter blue cloudy region towards the top right of the galaxy. This clump is filled with very young and hot newborn stars. This galaxy was initially thought to be a young galaxy undergoing its very first episode of star formation, but later research showed that Markarian 209 is actually very old, with an almost continuous history of forming new stars. It is thought to have never had a dormant period — a period during which no stars were formed — lasting longer than 100 million years. The dominant population of stars in Markarian 209 is still quite young, in stellar terms, with ages of under 3 million years. For comparison, the sun is some 4.6 billion years old, and is roughly halfway through its expected lifespan. The observations used to make this image were taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, and span the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared parts of the spectrum. A scattering of other bright galaxies can be seen across the frame, including the bright golden oval that could, due to a trick of perspective, be mistaken as part of Markarian 209 but is in fact a background galaxy. European Space Agency ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Nick Rose
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