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Welcome to the University of Arizona Astronomy Club website! Our goal is to inspire and assist anybody with a passion or interest in astronomy and science. We provide opportunities to work on astronomy projects with other students and astronomers who care deeply about astronomy education.

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

There will be no Sabino Canyon Star Party for the month of November. The monthly star party at this location will resume in the future; further updates will be posted as they become relevant.

Fall 2014 meetings will be held on Mondays from 5:00 PM to approximately 5:45 PM in Steward Observatory room N305, beginning on September 8, 2014. Please see the Meeting Notes page for meeting notes.

To join the club, we encourage you to show up to our meetings and join in on our projects or events! Semester dues are $10 which goes toward all of the projects and activities in which we participate. Please peruse our website for much more information about our club. If you have any questions, please use the form on the Contact page.

Check out the special session organized by the University of Arizona Astronomy Club at the 223rd American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C.: AAS 223 Session 159 Video or search YouTube for “uaastroclub” and “AAS 223 Session 159″.

OFFICE HOURS

Megan: Tuesdays from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM and from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Samantha: Mondays from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM and Fridays from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Carmen: Wednesdays from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Ali: Tuesdays from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM and Fridays from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Matthew: Mondays from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Erica: TBD

If you’re in Phoenix near Arizona State University, join our friends at the ASU Astronomy Club!

Join our group on Facebook!Join our group on Facebook! Visit our YouTube channel!UAAstroClub YouTube Channel
Map to Steward Observatory:
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University of Arizona Astronomy Club Star Parties Click to learn more about our star parties!

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Gallery

2012-06-14_19-23-49_477_sm arizona-undergrads-present-and-past_sm night-watch-by-rembrandt-and-ua_sm Fun in the gym

NASA Image of the Day

Hinode Captures Images of Partial Solar Eclipse

 
A partial solar eclipse was visible from much of North America before sundown on Thursday, Oct.23. A partial eclipse occurs when the moon blocks a portion of the sun from view. The Hinode spacecraft captured images of yesterday’s eclipse as it passed over North America using its X-ray Telescope.  During the eclipse, the new moon eased across the sun from right to left with the Sun shining brilliantly in the background.  And as a stroke of good luck, this solar cycle’s largest active region, which has been the source of several large flares over the past week, was centered on the sun’s disk as the moon transited! Hinode is in the eighth year of its mission to observe the sun. Previously, Hinode has observed numerous eclipses due to its high-altitude, sun-synchronous orbit.  As viewed from Hinode’s vantage point in space, this eclipse was annular instead of partial, which means that the entire moon moved in front of the sun but did not cover it completely.  In this situation, a ring of the sun encircles the dark disk of the moon. Led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Hinode mission is a collaboration between the space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe. NASA helped in the development, funding and assembly of the spacecraft's three science instruments. Hinode is part of the Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) Program within the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Hinode science operations. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory is the lead U.S. investigator for the X-ray telescope. Image Credit: NASA/JAXA/SAO
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