Sponsors

The following organizations have supported Astronomy Club through monetary donations. Their support continues to allow our organization to make an impact at the U of A, in the Tucson community, and beyond. For that, we sincerely thank you.

If you would like to donate money or astronomy equipment, please contact Megan Nieberding, the current University of Arizona Astronomy Club president, by using the email listed on our Contact page.

Sponsors:

Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA)
Donation >$4000

  • Binocular Telescope Project (primary mirrors, eyepieces)
  • Club T-shirts
  • Travel to send 3 students to the 217th American Astronomical Society (AAS) Meeting in Seattle
  • Registration fees for 3 students for the 218th AAS Meeting in Boston
Associated Students of the University of Arizona

Associated Students of the University of Arizona

 

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference (RTMC) Holmes Grant Committee
Donation $800

  • Binocular Telescope Project (secondary mirrors, structural components)
Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

 

The Toler Family
Donation $100, and club banner

  • General club expenses

Ms. Hannah Zanowski
Donation $100

  • General club expenses
  • AAS meeting expenses

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NASA Image of the Day

Hinode Captures Images of Partial Solar Eclipse

 
A partial solar eclipse was visible from much of North America before sundown on Thursday, Oct.23. A partial eclipse occurs when the moon blocks a portion of the sun from view. The Hinode spacecraft captured images of yesterday’s eclipse as it passed over North America using its X-ray Telescope.  During the eclipse, the new moon eased across the sun from right to left with the Sun shining brilliantly in the background.  And as a stroke of good luck, this solar cycle’s largest active region, which has been the source of several large flares over the past week, was centered on the sun’s disk as the moon transited! Hinode is in the eighth year of its mission to observe the sun. Previously, Hinode has observed numerous eclipses due to its high-altitude, sun-synchronous orbit.  As viewed from Hinode’s vantage point in space, this eclipse was annular instead of partial, which means that the entire moon moved in front of the sun but did not cover it completely.  In this situation, a ring of the sun encircles the dark disk of the moon. Led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Hinode mission is a collaboration between the space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe. NASA helped in the development, funding and assembly of the spacecraft's three science instruments. Hinode is part of the Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) Program within the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Hinode science operations. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory is the lead U.S. investigator for the X-ray telescope. Image Credit: NASA/JAXA/SAO
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