Sponsors

The following organizations have supported Astronomy Club through monetary donations. Their support continues to allow our organization to make an impact at the U of A, in the Tucson community, and beyond. For that, we sincerely thank you.

If you would like to donate money or astronomy equipment, please contact Kevin at kevinkhu @ email . arizona . edu.

Sponsors:

Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA)Donation >$4000

  • Binocular Telescope Project (primary mirrors, eyepieces)
  • Club T-shirts
  • Travel to send 3 students to the 217th American Astronomical Society (AAS) Meeting in Seattle
  • Registration fees for 3 students for the 218th AAS Meeting in Boston
Associated Students of the University of Arizona

Associated Students of the University of Arizona

 

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference (RTMC) Holmes Grant Committee – Donation $800

  • Binocular Telescope Project (secondary mirrors, structural components)
Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

 

The Toler Family – Donation $100, and club banner

  • General club expenses

Ms. Hannah Zanowski - Donation $100

  • General club expenses
  • AAS meeting expenses

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All pumpkins in Steward Chatting in the common room 2013scrapbookpage8 Having fun in the common room

NASA Image of the Day

Back Shell Tile Panels Installed on NASA's Orion Spacecraft

 
Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. > Engineers and Technicians Install Protective Shell on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Image Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis
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