Sponsors

The following organizations have supported Astronomy Club through monetary donations. Their support continues to allow our organization to make an impact at the U of A, in the Tucson community, and beyond. For that, we sincerely thank you.

If you would like to donate money or astronomy equipment, please contact Megan Nieberding, the current University of Arizona Astronomy Club president, by using the email listed on our Contact page.

Sponsors:

Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA)
Donation >$4000

  • Binocular Telescope Project (primary mirrors, eyepieces)
  • Club T-shirts
  • Travel to send 3 students to the 217th American Astronomical Society (AAS) Meeting in Seattle
  • Registration fees for 3 students for the 218th AAS Meeting in Boston
Associated Students of the University of Arizona

Associated Students of the University of Arizona

 

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference (RTMC) Holmes Grant Committee
Donation $800

  • Binocular Telescope Project (secondary mirrors, structural components)
Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

Riverside Telescope Makers Conference

 

The Toler Family
Donation $100, and club banner

  • General club expenses

Ms. Hannah Zanowski
Donation $100

  • General club expenses
  • AAS meeting expenses

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Gallery

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NASA Image of the Day

James Webb Space Telescope's Heart Survives Deep Freeze Test

 
After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Webb telescope's images will reveal the first galaxies forming 13.5 billion years ago. The telescope will also pierce through interstellar dust clouds to capture stars and planets forming in our own galaxy. At the telescope's final destination in space, one million miles away from Earth, it will operate at incredibly cold temperatures of -387 degrees Fahrenheit, or 40 degrees Kelvin. This is 260 degrees Fahrenheit colder than any place on the Earth’s surface has ever been. To create temperatures that cold on Earth, the team uses the massive thermal vacuum chamber at Goddard called the Space Environment Simulator, or SES, that duplicates the vacuum and extreme temperatures of space. This 40-foot-tall, 27-foot-diameter cylindrical chamber eliminates the tiniest trace of air with vacuum pumps and uses liquid nitrogen and even colder liquid helium to drop the temperature simulating the space environment. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. > More: NASA Webb's Heart Survives Deep Freeze Test Image Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn
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